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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtscha...
16,99 € *
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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtschaftsforschung ab 16.99 € als epub eBook: 1. Auflage. Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Wirtschaft,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 02.07.2020
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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtscha...
24,99 € *
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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtschaftsforschung ab 24.99 EURO

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 02.07.2020
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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtscha...
16,99 € *
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Public Good Experiment. Experimentelle Wirtschaftsforschung ab 16.99 EURO 1. Auflage

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 02.07.2020
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The Greek Crisis: A Greek Tragedy?
79,90 € *
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The seven year long, yet still on-going, Greek crisis continues because the Greek economy has not yet received the critical adjustments it needs. The current twin prescriptions of austerity measures designed to overcome the sovereign debt crisis mixed with often delayed reforms attempting to address the structural weaknesses of the country have achieved dubious results.Twenty authors - from Greece, the Greek diaspora, and others with a strong interest in Greece - review the current situation and offer up reform ideas in this issue of the Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung. Investigating recent Greek developments, each contribution analyzes the crisis from a range of unique perspectives, each also offering up suggestions for pathways out of the crisis. Areas covered include the overregulation and bureaucratic hurdles impeding a more dynamic economy, as well as needed reforms on labor and product markets, or the tax system. Societal aspects of the crisis - in the areas of education and health care - are reviewed. A reform agenda fostering stronger long-term growth is presented, including business friendly institutions and cutting of red tape, a reorganization of public finances, and an expansion of the Greek industrial base by strong investments in a better innovation system.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.07.2020
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EU Capital Markets Union: an alluring opportuni...
79,90 € *
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On September 30, 2015, the European Commission adopted an action plan to create a European Capital Markets Union (CMU). The chief purpose was to ease the access of small and mediumsized companies as well as start-ups to funds, in particular through raising funds in public capital markets. CMU should also create an environment conducive to long-term, sustainable investment, including in infrastructure. Concurrently, CMU should produce a more market-based and unified financing system within the European Union.This proposal for deep structural change in national financial markets rests on two explicit diagnoses: (1) Europe is too bank-dependent, which impedes growth. And, (2) an integrated (de-segmented) capital market allows for more cross-regional risk sharing, as appropriate in a monetary union.The core goals of the proposed CMU are (1) promoting the securitization of bank loans to SMEs, and (2) the channeling of private savings directly (without involvement of banks) into capital market products. In its green paper, "Building a Capital Markets Union", the European Commission holds that, "stronger capital markets would complement banks as a source of financing, and would unlock more investment for all companies, especially SMEs, and for infrastructure projects." In addition, a CMU would "attract more investment into the EU from the rest of the world, and make the financial system more stable by opening up a wider range of funding sources." This, of course, begs the question, and raises a policy issue at the same time: Are current plans for implementing a European CMU capable of turning these promises into reality?Upon its launching, the CMU initiative touched off controversial debates. Proponents hold that CMU can reduce financial fragmentation in Europe, support cross-border financial flows and foster access to finance, especially for SMEs. In contrast, critics consider CMU as an initiative ignoring analytical as well as practical lessons taught by the Great Financial Crisis, and resuming the financial deregulation efforts, betting again on the wrong set of institutions and instruments.In two issues of the Vierteljahrsheft zur Wirtschaftsforschung, we address the major aspects, having a bearing on this decisive policy matter. Issue 1 focusses on the EU Capital Markets Union's concept and its consequences from a micro-perspective. Issue 2 takes a macroeconomic or systemic angle, analyzing inter alia corollaries for monetary policy and risk-sharing across the Euro Area.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.07.2020
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Productivity indices
19,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject Business economics - Miscellaneous, grade: 5.50, University of Zurich (Institut für Empirische Wirtschaftsforschung (IEW)), course: Master Seminar QWG: Produktivitäts- und Effizienzmessung, language: English, abstract: Efficiency and productivity are two related concepts, which are helpful in order to describe the economic performance of production units. Whereas people have diverging notions of efficiency, we commonly agree about the meaning of productivity. The latter is a familiar and intuitive measure of economic performance that can be applied on different scales ranging from the individual worker up to whole nations (Färe et al., 2008). However, efficiency and productivity are strongly linked to each other through the various techniques by which the determinants of producer performance are measured. Efficiency can be defined as a comparison between observed and optimal values of the output and input level of a production unit (Lovell, 1993). Thereby, we may refer to the maximum output level that can be potentially obtained from a given input, or the minimum potential input level that is required to produce a given output. On the other hand, productivity is simply determined as the ratio of a producer's output to its input. There are two basic reasons to explain our interest in measuring efficiency and productivity. Most importantly, production units can be evaluated using these success indicators, which enable the comparison of the performance across production units or the performance change of a specific producer across time. Secondly, we are interested in identifying the source of efficiency or productivity differentials in order to design policies that should help to improve the performance of public and private institutions. Hence, performance measures can be useful to explore hypotheses about the effects of market structure, economic regulation or the effect of ownership on performance (Lovell, 1993). Based on this microeconomic framework, we may apply these measures to the empirical study of output growth differentials between alternative countries. Since the early approach of growth accounting that was introduced by Robert Solow (1957), many innovative methods for measuring efficiency and productivity have been developed. We can roughly distinguish between productivity indices, data-envelopment analysis and frontier production functions. This work is focused on the broad methodology of productivity indices, which includes traditional approaches as well as more developed aspects of productivity measurement based on production frontiers.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.07.2020
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EU Capital Markets Union: an alluring opportuni...
106,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

On September 30, 2015, the European Commission adopted an action plan to create a European Capital Markets Union (CMU). The chief purpose was to ease the access of small and mediumsized companies as well as start-ups to funds, in particular through raising funds in public capital markets. CMU should also create an environment conducive to long-term, sustainable investment, including in infrastructure. Concurrently, CMU should produce a more market-based and unified financing system within the European Union. This proposal for deep structural change in national financial markets rests on two explicit diagnoses: (1) Europe is too bank-dependent, which impedes growth. And, (2) an integrated (de-segmented) capital market allows for more cross-regional risk sharing, as appropriate in a monetary union. The core goals of the proposed CMU are (1) promoting the securitization of bank loans to SMEs; and (2) the channeling of private savings directly (without involvement of banks) into capital market products. In its green paper, »Building a Capital Markets Union«, the European Commission holds that, »stronger capital markets would complement banks as a source of financing, and would unlock more investment for all companies, especially SMEs, and for infrastructure projects.« In addition, a CMU would »attract more investment into the EU from the rest of the world; and make the financial system more stable by opening up a wider range of funding sources.« This, of course, begs the question, and raises a policy issue at the same time: Are current plans for implementing a European CMU capable of turning these promises into reality? Upon its launching, the CMU initiative touched off controversial debates. Proponents hold that CMU can reduce financial fragmentation in Europe, support cross-border financial flows and foster access to finance, especially for SMEs. In contrast, critics consider CMU as an initiative ignoring analytical as well as practical lessons taught by the Great Financial Crisis, and resuming the financial deregulation efforts, betting again on the wrong set of institutions and instruments. In two issues of the Vierteljahrsheft zur Wirtschaftsforschung, we address the major aspects, having a bearing on this decisive policy matter. Issue 1 focusses on the EU Capital Markets Union's concept and its consequences from a micro-perspective. Issue 2 takes a macroeconomic or systemic angle, analyzing inter alia corollaries for monetary policy and risk-sharing across the Euro Area.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.07.2020
Zum Angebot
Productivity indices
12,40 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject Business economics - Miscellaneous, grade: 5.50, University of Zurich (Institut für Empirische Wirtschaftsforschung (IEW)), course: Master Seminar QWG: Produktivitäts- und Effizienzmessung, language: English, abstract: Efficiency and productivity are two related concepts, which are helpful in order to describe the economic performance of production units. Whereas people have diverging notions of efficiency, we commonly agree about the meaning of productivity. The latter is a familiar and intuitive measure of economic performance that can be applied on different scales ranging from the individual worker up to whole nations (Färe et al., 2008). However, efficiency and productivity are strongly linked to each other through the various techniques by which the determinants of producer performance are measured. Efficiency can be defined as a comparison between observed and optimal values of the output and input level of a production unit (Lovell, 1993). Thereby, we may refer to the maximum output level that can be potentially obtained from a given input, or the minimum potential input level that is required to produce a given output. On the other hand, productivity is simply determined as the ratio of a producer's output to its input. There are two basic reasons to explain our interest in measuring efficiency and productivity. Most importantly, production units can be evaluated using these success indicators, which enable the comparison of the performance across production units or the performance change of a specific producer across time. Secondly, we are interested in identifying the source of efficiency or productivity differentials in order to design policies that should help to improve the performance of public and private institutions. Hence, performance measures can be useful to explore hypotheses about the effects of market structure, economic regulation or the effect of ownership on performance (Lovell, 1993). Based on this microeconomic framework, we may apply these measures to the empirical study of output growth differentials between alternative countries. Since the early approach of growth accounting that was introduced by Robert Solow (1957), many innovative methods for measuring efficiency and productivity have been developed. We can roughly distinguish between productivity indices, data-envelopment analysis and frontier production functions. This work is focused on the broad methodology of productivity indices, which includes traditional approaches as well as more developed aspects of productivity measurement based on production frontiers.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.07.2020
Zum Angebot
EU Capital Markets Union: an alluring opportuni...
82,20 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

On September 30, 2015, the European Commission adopted an action plan to create a European Capital Markets Union (CMU). The chief purpose was to ease the access of small and mediumsized companies as well as start-ups to funds, in particular through raising funds in public capital markets. CMU should also create an environment conducive to long-term, sustainable investment, including in infrastructure. Concurrently, CMU should produce a more market-based and unified financing system within the European Union. This proposal for deep structural change in national financial markets rests on two explicit diagnoses: (1) Europe is too bank-dependent, which impedes growth. And, (2) an integrated (de-segmented) capital market allows for more cross-regional risk sharing, as appropriate in a monetary union. The core goals of the proposed CMU are (1) promoting the securitization of bank loans to SMEs; and (2) the channeling of private savings directly (without involvement of banks) into capital market products. In its green paper, »Building a Capital Markets Union«, the European Commission holds that, »stronger capital markets would complement banks as a source of financing, and would unlock more investment for all companies, especially SMEs, and for infrastructure projects.« In addition, a CMU would »attract more investment into the EU from the rest of the world; and make the financial system more stable by opening up a wider range of funding sources.« This, of course, begs the question, and raises a policy issue at the same time: Are current plans for implementing a European CMU capable of turning these promises into reality? Upon its launching, the CMU initiative touched off controversial debates. Proponents hold that CMU can reduce financial fragmentation in Europe, support cross-border financial flows and foster access to finance, especially for SMEs. In contrast, critics consider CMU as an initiative ignoring analytical as well as practical lessons taught by the Great Financial Crisis, and resuming the financial deregulation efforts, betting again on the wrong set of institutions and instruments. In two issues of the Vierteljahrsheft zur Wirtschaftsforschung, we address the major aspects, having a bearing on this decisive policy matter. Issue 1 focusses on the EU Capital Markets Union's concept and its consequences from a micro-perspective. Issue 2 takes a macroeconomic or systemic angle, analyzing inter alia corollaries for monetary policy and risk-sharing across the Euro Area.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.07.2020
Zum Angebot